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Trademark Knowledge Base

The Three Distinguishing Marks Of Trademarks

Trademarks have distinguishing marks that make them obviously stand out from others, even be closely associated with a specific product or service. Think of the likes of Coca-Cola, Pepsi, and Heineken, among other internationally-known brands.

 

But what distinguishes a trademark from another? There are three marks – color, shape and smell – that make a trademark what it is.

 

Color Marks

Brands use certain colors to distinguish it from others, and many brands even have colors named after them. For example, Ferrari red is a specific color named after the distinctive red shade used on its cars.

Why use color as a mark? A color claim gives a clear indication of the rights over a specific shade when combined with other marks on a trademark.

Keep in mind that the color claim should be made at the time of the filing of application.

Be sure to state the particulars of the color claim and the colors claimed should correspond with the colors shown on the proposed trademark. The colors can also be referenced to an accepted color identification, such as CYMK or Pantone.

The proposed trademark should also be of a sufficiently high resolution and in JPEG format.

 

Shape Marks

The shape of the proposed trademark should also be described in detail on the application form. The shape claim statement should include as many details as possible, such as “The trademark consists of a stylized letter P set within a triangular-shaped background. The applicant makes a claim to the letter and shape as an element of the trademark.”

If necessary, several views of the proposed trademark can also be made. These can include a front view, a top view, and/or a side view.

 

Smell Marks

Only a distinctive smell can be registered as a trademark, a matter that an experienced agent or lawyer can provide professional advice on. But it must be emphasized that a smell isn’t likely to be considered as a distinctive mark for a trademark for goods where these are purchased for their smell. Examples include cosmetics, shampoo, washing powder, teas, and fragrances.

Furthermore, a smell cannot be considered distinctive under trademark laws unless it is recognized as such by consumers as a trademark. The smell shouldn’t be a sales gimmick either.

With modern society being a visual world, the importance of getting the color and shape aspects of a trademark cannot be overemphasized. The applicant should use the search function before submitting the proposed trademark lest it has significant similarities with an existing trademark, a ground for objection.

 

Keep in mind that there are details in each step that can throw a monkey wrench into a carefully laid-out plan. For this reason, hiring a professional trademark agent will be in the applicant’s best interest, especially in case of high-stakes proposed trademarks. For details of the trademark application, please contact us for free consulation.

 

CtR Intellectual Property Co.

Hong Kong Patent Application Grant Authorised Patent Agent

Offering Professional Patent,

Hong Kong Trademark Registration & Related Services

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Suggested Strategies For Trademark Protection In Hong Kong

First off, it must be emphasized that getting trademark registration approval in Hong Kong doesn’t automatically mean protection in other jurisdictions, not even in the People’s Republic of China despite Hong Kong’s administrative status. Trademark holders should then adopt the necessary strategies to protect their trademark rights both in and outside of Hong Kong, and here are a few suggestions.

 

Claim Priority

Hong Kong is a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO) and its trademark laws are in accordance with the Paris Convention treaty. These facts are the trademark holder’s first line of defense, so to speak, in protecting his rights against infringement in other countries and territories outside of Hong Kong.

 

What does this mean? Basically, the trademark holder has the right to claim priority in other WTO member countries, said claim of which can be filed within six months after the filing of an application for Hong Kong trademark registration. The claim priority should be made within the same or similar category of products or services.

 

The WTO member countries include the United States, the United Kingdom, China, Canada, Australia, India, Ireland, Oman, Japan, Philippines, and the member countries of the European Union. In effect, you have protection in many, if not most, countries of the world where your trademark may be used for commercial (i.e., profitable) purposes.

 

Since the claim priority policies and process can be overwhelming considering the number of factors that should be considered, trademark holders and applicants are well-advised to hire an experienced trademark agent. The agent will handle the legal and technical matters, which are aplenty, that involves claim priority, among other trademark-related matters.

 

Distinguishable Mark

Check that the trademark is, indeed, clearly different from other trademarks used in the same or similar class of products and/or services. The clearly distinguishable trademark provides protection in two ways: first, it cannot be infringed on by others; and second, it will not infringe on trademarks already owned by others.

 

Keep in mind that individuals and groups can be made liable for trademark infringement even in cases of different products or services. For as long as the two trademarks seem the same, then there’s likely to be reasonable cause for trademark infringement.

 

Register in China, Too

If registering the Hong Kong trademark doesn’t provide protection in China, then the same rule applies to trademarks registered in China – these trademarks aren’t protected in Hong Kong, too. The bottom line: Even if it means added expense and effort, register the trademark in both Hong Kong and China, as well as in other countries where it will be used.

 

Be sure to register the trademark in English in its Chinese characters so that it can be used locally. The trademark in Chinese can either be a full translation or a transliteration. This is necessary to complement the original trademark and to provide it with a wide protection and appeal, especially in Hong Kong and China where both the English and Chinese languages are used.

 

For details of the trademark registration, please contact us for free consulation.

 

 

CtR Intellectual Property Co.

Hong Kong Patent Application Grant Authorised Patent Agent

Offering Professional Patent and Trademark Application & Related Services

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Hong Kong Trademarks Registration Process Briefly Explained

The Hong Kong trademarks registration process is among the world’s fastest in terms of timescale. Of course, the timescale will be different between applicants – for example, Applicant A may have technical deficiencies while Applicant B may have duplication of trademarks. But if there are no significant issues in the application, the process takes as little as six months to complete from receipt to registration.

 

Checking for Deficiencies

The Trade Marks Registry will conduct a thorough checking of the application forms and its attachments, if any, to determine their completeness, correctness, and compliance with the rules. The applicant is then well-advised to thoroughly check the forms so that all required information is stated.

 

While some changes to the application form won’t affect the filing date, there are major changes that can result in its rejection (e.g., changes to the trademark’s representation).

 

Search and Examination

If the Registry examiner finds that the application form and its attachments are in order, the documents will be forwarded for search and examination. Basically, this step determines whether the proposed trademark has the same or similar trademarks already filed or registered in respect to the same or similar class of products and/or services. If there are similarities, the application will be returned to the applicant for proper action.

 

The Registry examiner will also determine whether the proposed trademark satisfies the registration requirements stated on the Hong Kong Trade Marks Ordinance. He will then issue an opinion in writing – or a letter addressed to the applicant – that states whether the application is acceptable for Hong Kong trademark registration or not, usually when there are reasonable grounds for objection.

 

If the Registry has objections to the proposed trademark, the applicant is give six months to comply with the requirements and complete the documents, if necessary. The applicant may also request for a three-month extension after the six-month period has lapsed.

 

The applicant will be informed about the Registry’s objection to the proposed trademark and, if possible, suggest ways for resolving the issues. But if the objection still stands for any reason, the applicant can ask for a three-month extension but only under specific circumstances stated in the trademarks rules. The applicant may also call for a hearing.

 

Publication

If the proposed trademark has been found in compliance with the trademarks rules and regulations, it will be published in the Hong Kong Intellectual Property Journal. But the publication can also invite opposition to the proposed trademark, usually from a third party.

 

Registration

If there are no issues with the proposed trademark, it will be accepted for registration. The Notice of Registration will be published again in the journal.

 

Keep in mind that there are details in each step that can throw a monkey wrench into a carefully laid-out plan. For this reason, hiring a professional Hong Kong trademark agent will be in the applicant’s best interest, especially in case of high-stakes proposed trademarks. For details of the Hong Kong trademark application, please contact us for free consulation.

 

 

CtR Intellectual Property Co.

Hong Kong Patent Application Grant Authorised Patent Agent

Offering Professional Patent,

Hong Kong Trademark Registration & Related Services

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Checking For Duplications In Hong Kong Trademark Application

While every person and organization has the right to register a trademark in Hong Kong, it’s important to conduct an initial search for possible duplication of trademarks before the Hong Kong trademark application. In some cases, another person or organization may have already applied for a registration or have already been granted a registration for the same or similar trademark. The trademark planned for registration may then be met with an objection from the Trade Marks Registry.

 

Take Advantage of the Services

Fortunately, the Hong Kong Trade Marks Registry offers applicants its Search and Preliminary Advice services wherein information about trademarks can be obtained from its records.  The Registry can perform a search of its database and provide a concerned application with a list of trademarks that are either similar or the same as the proposed trademark. The proposed trademark itself will be compared to the same or similar class of products and/or services; the thorough search is necessary to ensure there’s no duplication of trademarks.

 

The Registry also provides initial advice about the distinctiveness of a proposed trademark. Keep in mind that the proposed trademark should be, in the Registry’s words, sufficiently distinctive such that it can be easily distinguished from same or similar products and services offered by other traders.

 

Emphasis must be made that these Registry services aren’t free. The applicant must complete and submit Form T1 and pay the appropriate fee – HK$400 for every service and HK$200 for every added class of products or services, if any, as of this writing – to the “Trade Marks Registry, Intellectual Property Department, 24/F, Wu Chung House, Wanchai, 213 Queen’s Road East, Hong Kong”.

 

Factors to be Considered in Distinctiveness

Even before filing the trademark application and availing of the above mentioned Trade Marks Registry services, applicants are well-advised to check their proposed trademarks for initial determination of their “sufficient distinctiveness”. The most important considerations include:

 

  • Is the trademark distinctive?

 

The trademark should stand out from the rest of the crowd, whether it’s a word, a picture or a logo. If it’s a word, for example, it can be a made-up word that may or may not be associated with the business.

 

  • Is it a description of the products or services of your business?

 

The trademark shouldn’t be a description of your products and/or services or something that shows the purpose, quality and/or quantity, and/or the value of the products and/or services. The Registry will most likely reject your Hong Kong trademark application if it does any of these things. Examples include “Hong Kong Fashion” or “AAA Quality Watches”.

 

  • Is it a commonly used or well-known term used in industry, niche, or line or business?

 

The trademark shouldn’t be used by nearly every Tom, Dick and Harry engaged in the same or similar line of business – if it is, then the application will be rejected by the Registry. Examples include “V8” for automobiles, “Cow Leather” for bags, and “Swiss movements” for watches.

 

Obviously, applying for registration of the same or similar trademarks already owned by other persons and organizations isn’t allowed under the trademarks laws of Hong Kong.

 

As the trademark application needs professional knowledge and experience, we suggest hiring an experienced trademark attorney for individuals and organizations. For details of the Hong Kong trademark registration, please contact us for free consulation.

 

 

CtR Intellectual Property Co.

Hong Kong Patent Application Grant Authorised Patent Agent

Offering Professional Patent and

Hong Kong Trademark Application & Related Services

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Extreme Caution: A Must When Dealing With Solicitations After U.S. Trademark Application

After filing an initial application for U.S. trademark registration, it can be problematic, too. The problem can start with a response to one or more of the solicitations from private companies, a problem that can be prevented if and when you exercise extreme caution when dealing with these offers.

 

Here are the things that you should be aware of about trademark-related solicitations.

 

Cold Calling Is the Norm

 

Solicitation come in two forms: first, an offer of service for trademark initial application; and second, a notice of an approaching trademark filing deadline accompanied by an offer of service. In both cases, there’s usually a fee for the performance of these services.

 

Your next question is: Why did you get these solicitations from private companies? Keep in mind that when you file a mark application with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), the information on the application form will become part of the public database. As such, the general public can access your information including your full name and street address.

 

The private companies sending these solicitations use the USPTO database to identify the individuals and organizations that have filed applications and have upcoming filing deadlines. But always remember that you are never required by the USPTO and other regulatory agencies to use their services in any manner and form.

 

Beware of the Legitimacy of the Services

 

Let’s say that you consider the solicitation because it appears legitimate. But don’t plunge with both feet, however, as not all of the services offered are legal and legitimate. You have to exercise extreme caution in considering the types of services offered, especially if these seem too good to be true.

 

For example, offers for assistance in making an appropriate response to an office action (i.e., a letter from the USPTO detailing the substantive reasons for its refusal to register your mark). But if it’s an offer to record your trademarks in a non-public registry, you should ignore the solicitation – a private registry of trademarks isn’t recognized under present trademark laws in the United States.

 

Fortunately, you can easily tell the difference between official USPTO notices and potentially misleading offers. For one thing, the official correspondence regarding your initial application or maintenance of registration will be addressed as from the United States Patent and Trademark Office from its national headquarters in Alexandria, Virginia. All e-mails will have “@uspto.gov” as the domain name; if it isn’t, your alarm bells should be ringing.

 

For another thing, the notice from dubious private companies offering trademark registration services can have threatening words to emphasize the urgency of an upcoming deadline. Don’t believe the deadlines stated on these notices – instead, use the Trademark Status and Document Retrieval feature on the USPTO database to check the deadlines.

 

Ultimately, you have the responsibility to protect yourself against scams, especially as the USPTO doesn’t have the legal authority to prevent private entities from sending unsolicited offers and notices.

 

As the trademark application is quite professional, we suggest hiring an experienced trademark attorney for individuals and organizations. For details of the trademark registration, please contact us for free consulation.

 

 

CtR Intellectual Property Co.

Hong Kong Patent Application Grant Authorised Patent Agent

Offering Professional Patent and

Trademark Application & Related Services

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Should You Abandon Your Trademark Application?

The short answer: It depends on whether the abandonment will work for you or against you.  Since even your decision to abandon your trademark application has its legal and practical implications, you should seriously considering hiring an experienced trademark attorney.

With or without an attorney, here are a few things that you must consider when deciding whether to abandon or not your application.

 

Consider the Grounds for Rejection

The action letter, or the rejection letter issued by the USPTO after the examining attorney’s initial examination of you application has been completed, contains the valid grounds for rejection. These grounds can range from technical grounds (e.g., procedural mistake) to substantive grounds (e.g. likelihood of confusion), and each ground should be answered satisfactorily by the patent applicant for the application process to proceed.

 

From the careful consideration of the grounds stated in the action letter, you can make a decision of abandonment or continuance. You may, for example, abandon the application in case of a rejection based on descriptiveness – if your mark is descriptive according to the standards set by the USPTO, then getting it registered doesn’t give you extra protection in case of an infringement. You can’t sue everybody who uses the descriptive words used in your mark since these are generic by nature.

 

If the rejection was based on the likelihood of confusion, you have to consider whether the costs in time, energy and money will be worth the benefits in name recognition and recall. You must consider, too, the possibility of a trademark infringement lawsuit if you continue using the mark.

 

Let’s say that you decide to abandon your application. You should ideally make an express statement of abandonment by filing a Request for Express Abandonment (Withdrawal) of Application through the Trademark Electronic Application System (TEAS), an online system at the USPTO official website.

 

Beware the Consequences of Abandonment

Lest you think that abandonment of your trademark application is easy – look, Ma, no consequences – it isn’t. Keep in mind that there are several ways of abandoning your mark and with these ways come consequences that you should be prepared to deal with.

 

Let’s assume that for one reason or another, you stopped using the mark for a prolonged period or you failed to maintain quality control over its use. Under the trademark laws, you are considered as having abandoned the trademark and, thus, you will lose the exclusive right to its use.

 

What can you do if the USPTO sends an action letter expressing final rejection of your mark as non-registrable? You can appeal to the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board in case the reason for rejection was substantive; file a petition to the director if the reason for rejection was technical or procedural; request the examining attorney to make another examination; or amend the application and seek for registration on the Supplemental Register in case of a descriptive mark-based rejection.

 

And, of course, you can abandon the application and give up the exclusive right to your mark.

 

For details of the trademark application, please contact us for free consulation.

 

CtR Intellectual Property Co.

Hong Kong Patent Application Grant Authorised Patent Agent

Offering Professional Patent Application & Related Services

Responding To Rejections Of Trademark Applications

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) can reject trademark applications on several grounds. The trademark applicant must know the best way to respond to the rejection – and it’s definitely not writing a scathing letter disparaging the USPTO examiner’s qualifications – to get a favorable outcome in the end. Here are things that you need to know about it.

 

Action Letters

The USPTO examiners write three types of action letters, the term used for U.S. trademark application rejections.

  • Technical rejections typically involve procedural oversights or minor matters that can easily be resolved by the appropriate amendments.
  • Substantive rejections usually involve more complicated matters, such as the likelihood of confusion, generic claim, and descriptive mark, which are more challenging to resolve. In most cases, the professional assistance of an experienced patent lawyer is recommended, if not a must, to get approval.
  • Final rejections are written and issued only after you have failed to respond to either of the two abovementioned rejections at least once.

 

If you receive either a technical or a substantive rejection in the mail or by telephone, you shouldn’t lose hope as the examining attorney will give you at least one chance to answer. You will find that these action letters are common so you’re not being singled out, discriminated against, or targeted for exclusion by the USPTO.

 

Prescription Period

The action letter always specifies the number of months that you should respond to the issues being raised as the reasons for rejection. In general, the USPTO gives applicants six months to make the appropriate response to an action letter.

 

If you don’t respond within the prescribed period, you run the risk of having your application considered as abandoned by the USPTO. In case of abandonment, you have to return to square one of the application process if you still want the trademark registration.

 

The bottom line: Always send your response to an action letter as soon as possible. But avoid rushing your response since you don’t want to run the risk of yet another rejection call or letter for a minor matter. You have to double check that, indeed, your response corresponds to the grounds for rejection.

 

Choices to Make

You can choose from these three choices when responding to the action letter:

  • Make a response on your own
  • Hire a trademark attorney to handle the response
  • Abandon your application

 

If you respond to the action letter yourself, you have to make sure that you can actually handle it well – and it’s usually the case for technical rejections. But if you can’t handle the complexity of the grounds for rejection, you shouldn’t try to do so unless you’re willing to risk final rejection.  Your trademark lawyer’s services may seem expensive at first but when you consider the benefits, you will likely be willing to pay for these services in the future.

 

 

For details of the trademark application and its related services, please contact us for free consulation.

 

CtR Intellectual Property Co.

Hong Kong Patent Application Grant Authorised Patent Agent

Offering Professional Patent Application & Related Services

Why Hire An Attorney For Your Initial U.S. Trademark Application?

Filing a U.S. trademark application isn’t for the faint-hearted, so to speak, because of the time, energy and effort involved in understanding the trademark law, meeting the requirements of the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), and dealing with the subsequent actions (e.g., issuance of Office Action). For this reason, you should seriously consider hiring an attorney to take care of the trademark registration in your behalf.

 

What can an experienced lawyer, particularly one with extensive experience in trademark laws, do for you?

 

Provide Appropriate Legal Advice

Of course, you can file the application on your own and request the USPTO examining attorney to provide tips that will expedite your application. But the USPTO attorney cannot provide legal advice even if he wants to because otherwise it will be a conflict of interest.

 

The trademark attorney, in contrast, will provide legal advice regarding your application and its related issues. You can get answers to questions like, “Is the mark protectable by the trademark laws? Are the class of products and/or services that the marks apply to identifiable? Are you able to take appropriate action when the USPTO refuses to register the mark?”

 

Think of your attorney as your main man in ensuring that your mark becomes registered and protected from infringement by others.

 

Conduct Searches on the Database

Again, you can search the state and federal databases for similar trademarks as the mark you’re seeking registration for. But it’s such a time-consuming process that you likely won’t have the time and energy for, perhaps not even the patience. Besides, you will likely have other business matters to attend to.

 

With an attorney on board, you can delegate the task to the professional. Your attorney will search the USPTO database of registered trademarks at the federal level, as well as other databases including the state registration database and the common law unregistered trademarks database. The comprehensive search is a must because even non-registered trademarks similar to your mark and used for selling products and/or services related to yours may well prevent you from registering, using and profiting from your mark, no matter if you think it was your original idea.

 

Protect Your Trademark Rights

Your attorney can also provide information that will deepen your understanding of your rights and responsibilities as a trademark owner. You will also be provided with relevant advice about the best ways to monitor and enforce your rights and responsibilities, especially in terms of others infringing on your mark. You should also remember that you may also be charged of infringing on other people’s trademarks and your attorney can provide legal assistance on this matter.

 

The crucial role of your attorney doesn’t stop with the initial application. You can also rely on him or her for meeting the registration maintenance documents, which should be filed on a regular basis. You can then maintain ownership over your mark, a must if you want to continue profiting from it.

 

 

For details of the trademark registration application, please contact us for free consulation.

 

CtR Intellectual Property Co.

Hong Kong Patent Application Grant Authorised Patent Agent

Offering Professional Patent Application & Related Services

The Possible Grounds For Trademark Refusal

Keep in mind that not every initial application for a trademark will be granted approval. The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), specifically the examining attorney assigned to your trademark application, can issue an Office Action outlining the substantive reasons for trademark refusal of your application. This brings us to the question: What are the possible substantive reasons that your trademark application can be refused?

 

Likelihood of Confusion

Keep in mind that the USPTO will conduct a search of its database for conflicting marks only after an initial application has been filed. The examining attorney will determine whether your trademark being applied for has a similar one either still pending or already registered in the USPTO database. The process can take several months so patience is necessary.

 

The marks and the related products and/or services between your mark and the marks of other entities don’t have to be exactly the same for conflict or confusion to be considered. Instead, it’s considered sufficient if both the marks and their related products and/or services are similar in nature. The similarity should be such that consumers will likely mistakenly believe that both of them come from the same source.

 

The similarity can be on anything from sound and appearance to meaning. These can include phonetic equivalents, T.J. Chicken and Tee-Jay Chicken; similar appearance even when one uses another stylized; and meaning like “Lupo” and “Wolf” with both having similar images.

 

Merely Descriptive

The USPTO’s examining attorney will also refuse trademark registration if it merely describes a quality, ingredient, function, characteristic, purpose, or feature of the product and/or service. For example, the mark “Creamy Yogurt” or “World’s Best Bagels” are unacceptable because these merely describe the products instead of being a distinctive brand.

 

Deceptively Misdescriptive

The mark registration application will also be refused if the mark itself misdescribes a quality, ingredient, function, characteristic, purpose, or feature of the product and/or service; and the misrepresentation being conveyed is possible. Examples include “THC Tea” for tea-based beverages without THC.

 

Both the merely descriptive and deceptively misdescriptive grounds for refusal also applies to primarily geographical circumstances. There are several instances when it happens including:

 

  • The mark’s primary significance is a generally known geographic location; the consumers/buyers will likely think that the products and/or services come from the place stated on the mark; and the mark identifies the specific place of origin of said products and/or services. This applies to merely descriptive marks.

 

  • In case of a deceptively misdescriptive mark, its primary significance is a generally known geographic location; the consumers/buyers will likely think that the products and/or services come from the place stated on the mark; the products and/or services don’t actually come from the stated place; and the misrepresentation will be a significant factor in the decision-making of consumers.

 

With these strict requirements, you are well-advised to hire an experienced trademark attorney and consultant so that your initial application will have a higher chance of being approved.

 

 

For details of the trademark registration, please contact us for free consulation.

 

CtR Intellectual Property Co.

Hong Kong Patent Application Grant Authorised Patent Agent

Offering Professional Patent Application & Related Services

Crucial Things To Remember About Your Trademark Application

The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) conducts an intensive examination of every trademark application submitted by individuals, groups and organizations. Keep in mind that registering your trademark, which can be an image, words or sound, can be a challenging task because of the strict requirements and process, especially if you’re taking it on your own.

We suggest that you hire an experienced trademark agent or attorney to handle the dirty work, so to speak. But it also pays to know the basics of the initial application process since it’s your trademark and the rights and responsibilities that come with it rests squarely on your shoulders.

 

Select Your Mark Properly

If you want to start the trademark registration process on the right foot, you have to select your mark properly. You have to choose it with extreme care since not every mark can be registered with the USPTO and not every mark can also be legally protected. In case of the latter, a mark may be unacceptable as a basis for a legal claim by its owner who wants to prevent others from using a similar mark on related products and/or services.

 

You don’t want to make the rookie mistake of submitting an initial application for your trademark only to find out that it cannot be registered. Aside from checking that, indeed, it can be registered, you have to determine the ease and effectiveness of protecting it based on its strength.

 

You have to take note, too, that USPTO isn’t responsible for the enforcement of your trademark – its primary function is to register trademarks and patents. You, the trademark owner, have the primary and exclusive responsibility for its enforcement including when others are using it to their commercial advantage.

 

You should also take note of the acceptable format of marks before submission to the USPTO. You must also precisely identify your products and/or services that the mark will be applied on.

 

Search the Database

Before you file a trademark application, you should also search the USPTO database for similar marks. Your main goal: To determine whether another individual or organization has already claimed trademark rights similar to your mark and used them on related products and/or services through a federal registration.

 

A clearance search will save costs on trademark registration, too, since the USPTO generally doesn’t grant refunds. Thus, even if your initial application isn’t approved for one reason or another, a refund check won’t be in your mail.

 

You must also know that any and all personal information submitted to the USPTO at any point in the application and registration process becomes public record. Your full name, phone number and e-mail address, and street address will be part of the public database, which may or may not be a cause for concern on your part.

 

For details of the trademark registration, please contact us for free consulation.

 

CtR Intellectual Property Co.

Hong Kong Patent Application Grant Authorised Patent Agent

Offering Professional Patent and Trademark Application & Related Services